Monthly Archives: April 2010

Approaching Neverland wins best memoir

More great news for Approaching Neverland, which just won the NABE Pinnacle Book Award Spring 2010 Award for Memoir!

Come see me on View from the Bay

Would love to have you join me on the set of View from the Bay for my appearance on May 7th! It’s free and should be a blast — you’ll have the chance to meet co-hosts Spencer Christian and Janelle Wang and see all that great behind the scenes stuff!
Here’s how to do it:
Tickets for the show are FREE but must be reserved in advance. Audience doors open at 2:15pm with a cut-off time of 2:30pm, the show is live from 3-4pm.
To reserve your seats please call the ticket request line at (415)-954-7733 or visit http://www.viewfromthebay.com and click on “be in our audience” and fill out a ticket request form. Or click on the link below to go to the online ticket request form. Simply fill out your information and press submit.
http://abclocal.go.com/kgo/feature?section=view_from_the_bay&id=6337461
Under “comments” please be sure to note “Peggy Kennedy.”

Approaching Neverland on Kindle

I’m very excited that Approaching Neverland is on Kindle

Within Our Reach

Looking forward to reading Rosalyn Carter’s new book Within our Reach, which covers the recent history (past 30 years) of mental illness in America and how today,  recovery is more possible than ever before.

NNAMI’s Great Tips for Parents

Just found a great Australian site — National Network of Adult & Adolescent Children of Mentally Ill Parents — with super advice (see below). The site also features a great downloadable Family Management Crisis Plan.

http://www.nnaami.org

Tips for Parents with a mental illness for managing life with Children and Young people.

  • Be honest with you kids.
  • Let them know when you are feeling stressed.
  • Talk to them about what you can and can’t do.
  • Don’t wrap your kids up in cotton wool. (Hav to admit I’m a little in the dark about the cotton wool advice — pk).
  • Let them do ‘kids things’ within reason, let them go to birthday parties and to the pool to the gym.
  • Let them go to youth groups, sporting activities, church, religious activities.
  • Don’t be over protective.
  • Because when you are really unwell these positive experiences from these things can pay off.
  • Let them talk to friends and develop friendships in these activities; you have to let them be part of their community.
  • Keep well by taking your medication, have regular contact with your psychiatrist.
  • Give your kids positive reinforcement.
  • Tell them they have done a good job when they have done the washing up or the vacuuming or a task that you appreciate.
  • Tell them that you love them, unconditionally, as often as you can.
  • Does not matter what they do (your kids), good or bad, tell them that you love them.